Wednesday, November 26, 2008

Old Documents


Catching up on my TiVo'd stuff, I was watching Bill Maher recently. During the program, there was a debate that was so simple and poignant I was surprised I never realized the silliness of an aspect of our government: the 2-seat Senate setup. Most democratic countries don't have a bicameral legislature, and those that do have both houses based on a proportion of their total populations (like we do in the House of Representatives). Clearly, this is a better system, because it means people are represented equally.

Bill Maher brought it up amidst a discussion of other things, and his guest, Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (a Republican from Florida) offered no explanation. In fact, she seemed in agreement that the Senate's two people per state setup is backwards for a democracy, and I'm thinking very much the same way. I haven't researched why the Founders wanted it this way, but if the most senior female Republican Congresswoman and a liberal Libertarian are in agreement that it is stupid and antiquated, it must be stupid and antiquated, right?

This makes me think about the Electoral College, too. It's just plain stupid to have this winner-takes-all system where shadowy delegates decide whether we get a Republican or a Democrat, with no correlation to the popular vote. What's the point in voting then?!

And political parties - don't even get me started about them. They need to be gone already. Even Washington said that they're toxic in a democracy: what more proof do you need?

I love 90% of what's in the Constitution, but the stuff about political parties, the electoral college, and the Senate setup just needs to go. Why are we so in love with a document written over 200 years ago? It's just plain goofy to think old men from an old era knew everything. It's a damn shame we can't change what's in there, only add onto it with amendments (or, of course, repeal amendments).

Oh well. I guess I shouldn't be surprised. Al Gore can win the Nobel peace prize but he can't win our presidency.

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